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Fashion: Behind the Scene

MLC Centre Campaign 09 Photoshoot Read more.

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Fashion: Behind the Scene

MLC Centre Campaign 09 Photoshoot

Here’s a sneak peak behind the scenes of a recent photoshoot with art direction by Simon Hancock with renown fashion photographer James Cant for the new MLC Centre Brand Campaign. The new look advertising campaign will launch in early September.

Posted by Paul Taboure in Advertising, Design, Fashion, Photography and Retail.
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It's makeover time!

Who doesn't love a good makeover? Especially when it's a CBD retail centre and we're the style maven Read more.

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It's makeover time!

The studio is currently hard at work reimagining the brand campaign for a CBD retail centre. We are bringing the trademark 'THERE eye' and working closely with the centre's marketing team to create something new, stylish and exciting for their brand. 

As you can see from these sneak peek images, there are some very difficult creative decisions to be made. It's going to be a fun and challenging proposition to marry the brand strategy with a killer visual for this campaign! Stay tuned. 

Posted by Jon Zhu in Branding, Fashion, Advertising, Photography and Insights.
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How you speak, not just how you look

In branding, it's not just how you look that counts — increasingly brands are using tone of voice as an effective way to differentiate, connect with an audience and gain competitive advantage. Read more.

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How you speak, not just how you look

Whilst we're designers, or visual people, at heart, more and more copy is king. We're helping our clients figure out what's being said, and how to say it, rather than simply 'flowing it in' at the last minute. 

Tone of voice, verbal identity, brand personality — there's lot's of buzz words and jargon to describe it. Increasingly of late, it's become a key offering of any self respecting brand consultancy. It's a badge of honour in some agencies to have writers on staff, turning out columns, pages and slides of crafted, honed and perfected copy that evokes a brand's values, creates a personality around a brand and connects in it's audience in an authentic way.

For me, the words on the page, and the design that visualises and arranges them, have always been inseparable. One of my earliest 'big briefs', working solo on an annual report, went a little bit pear–shaped as I couldn't stop changing the copy - everything from the headlines, pull quotes down to the tiniest details in body copy. My own creative process actually revolves around key words and semiotics, rather than colours, texture or symbolism. Once I have the words right, the message, then I can design.

That's not to say one is more important than the other – they're both two halves of the whole, equally important and necessary for the success of any brand in our increasingly complicated, diverse and fast moving world. For many years, agencies neglected the other half - dominated by visual designers, visual thinkers and marketers or client teams who considered the words to be their domain, supplied to their design team to 'flow in'.

Thankfully, creating an ownable and distinct tone of voice has become considered part of the branding agency's remit, and we at THERE are seeing the effects of this industry shift in our own work. Increasingly we're being called upon to not only design a visual identity, but also to name a brand, to create it's key messages and narrative, and then to articulate, define and document a tone of voice, or verbal identity. It's both a pleasure and an enormous challenge to take so much responsibility on behalf of a client in shaping the fundamental building blocks of their brand.

Below, we've collected a few great examples of verbal identity, the organisations represented are varied and diverse, from large mega corporations, small boutique juice company, to a 'dry bar', providing a place to socialise for people battling addiction. The tones of voice are equally rich and diverse, but tellingly feature wit or humour. This was by no means intentional, but it was interesting to notice how brands that have a little fun, embrace humour and share a smile with their audience rise to the top and create impact, are memorable and in many cases, more successful.

Nudie Juice, Australia
Nudie have mastered a naive, almost childlike tone of voice that masks a sophisticated intent, to change our way of thinking about our fruit juice, the manner it which it is made, and the contents within. Their verbal identity is thus defined by the tone of their voice, as well as the substance of what they talk about. Nudie have a purpose or mission, they're direct about it, but they have a disarmingly authentic cuteness in the way they express themselves.
Credit: Jack Watts Currie, Sydney

Air Asia X / Virgin Blue, Australia
Virgin have built a global business based on their 'Robin Hood Rebellion' business strategy and brand positioning. They find markets with entrenched, monopolistic leaders, and enter as an irreverent, value option that champions the customers needs — leading the rebellion against the status quo. This gives them incredible license to be cheeky, funny and sometimes just plain naughty.

Macmillan Cancer, UK
A common strategy for building a recognizable verbal identity, is a repeatable, adaptable messaging structure — or to put it simply, let's call it a catch phrase. Macmillan appended 'We are' to the beginning of their brand mark, transforming it from a logo to a bold declaration, a proud statement of belonging. The rest of the identity utilises these 'We are' statements almost too repetitively, but the bold visual approach balances the phrases and gives the whole identity a strong, punchy feel not often seen in the not for profit health sector.
Credit: Wolff Olins

Apple, USA
The world dominating tech company from Cupertino has never been afriad of creating memorable, distinctive communications - from the iconic 1984 super bowl commercial, to the long running and beloved 'I'm a Mac' campaign. Increasingly Apple has lost it's edge with regards to it's tone of voice, becoming a monotonous parade of superlatives – and the satirists have taken advantage of this hubris. But every now and then Apple's copywriters get a gem out the door, and this headline from the iPod Touch site is a great example.
Credit: Apple Inc.

 

The Brink, UK
The last example is probably my favourite of the round up. The Brink in Liverpool is a 'dry bar' — a safe, welcoming and lively place for people battling adiction. Somewhere to hang out, socialise and enjoy yourself, where the strongest drink on hand is a coffee. The use of these catchy little sayings borders on the poetic, creating an optimistic, fun verbal identity that also rolled out to aspects of the branded environment.
Credit: SB Studio & Reed Words.

 

Posted by Clinton Duncan in Advertising, Branding and Identity.
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Is Apple a design company?

Like many others, I spent some time today looking over the suite of new and updated products from Apple at this years WWDC. Most interesting of all, however, was a new brand ad, communicating the pride they have in signing their products 'Designed by Apple in California'. Read more.

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Is Apple a design company?

Like many others, I spent some time today looking over the suite of new and updated products from Apple. The new Mac Pro is cool, the new iOS look and feel was very, let’s call it, “new”, and the other stuff they shared was one, the other and often both at once.

I try not to bring up Apple too much in discussions with my clients, as most times I do, it’s dismissed. It seems many people in marketing and business don’t think the laws of the real world apply to the Cupertino based company and the enviable brand they’ve built - as if by magic Apple are able to play by a different set of rules.

I spend a fair bit of time thinking, reading, learning about and admiring Apple. I’m also using at least one and often a few of their products every waking hour of my day; from listening to music from my iPhone in my car driving to work, working on a Mac to reading on my iPad Mini before bed. I admire the company greatly. Most people roll their eyes when I say that, and I understand why; I sound like a fanboy, as if I’ve been seduced into the cult.

But what I admire about Apple is their culture - a way of thinking, working and making things that, as far as I can tell, has been indelibly marked by the force of will, personality and values of their charismatic founder, Steve Jobs. Steve was fond of saying in many of his keynotes that Apple sits at the intersection of the liberal arts and technology, and in a Forbes article he probably hit upon his most eloquent expression of the ideal;

“It is in Apple’s DNA that technology alone is not enough – it’s technology married with liberal arts, married with the humanities, that yields us the results that make our heart sing.”

It wasn’t until today I realised Steve wasn’t just talking about Apple - the above metaphor, of an intersection of liberal arts and technology, is the perfect expression of what design is. The different disciplines of design are distinguished along technocratic lines - architects and interior designers understand a mullion from a spandrel, industrial designers learn the myriad tolerances of different materials, web designers know PHP from CSS, and graphic designers know all sorts of stuff like how to export a PDF.

Technological differences define and separates design disciplines, be they the productivity software we use, our technical jargon, the production or construction methods. But all design disciplines can speak the language of less is more, of balance and form, of composition. We can all admire and appreciate each other’s output, we all have a favourite painter, illustrator or photographer. From my experience, most people in the design industries are socially progressive, politically aware and have read a book or two.

Often in my work I try to distill a ‘brand idea’ - a snappy two or three word expression of the core idea that underpins a business, the products they put out to the world, what they value, their culture and heritage.

Probably seems obvious - Apple is, at it’s core, a design company, free from clients and budgets. A design company where perfection is the only goal and how much your work changes the world is the true measure of success. Today I realised, again, why I love Apple so much - they’re the perfect design company; they have colleagues not clients, incredibly high standards, and a huge impact in making people’s live better - which sounds to me like any designer’s dream job.

 

 

Posted by Clinton Duncan in Advertising, Branding, Design, Identity, and Digital.
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Polaroid Cube

New challenger active-technology by retro photography brand Polaroid hits the streets. Introducing The Cube. Read more.

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Polaroid Cube

I love this fun new bit released technology by retro photography brand Polaroid. Want.

The Polaroid Cube, a tiny, cute HD action-video camera, is now available for pre-order on its website—it will debut in October 2014 with a full range of accessories and mounts. 

Priced at only US$99, it may offer a viable alternative to the popular GoPro, which costs two to four times as much—according to Polaroid CEO Scott Hardy, the Cube is not targeting the “the professional and amateur and aspirational thrill-seekers but going after more of the lifestyle segments”. 

Although it is small—measuring at just 35mm—this latest product from Polaroid is highly competent as a tool for documenting one’s life in a fun, convenient way. 

Other than being weatherproof, shockproof and mountable, it is also very easy to use with a single button on its top—press once to capture a still image, and twice for video. 

Source: Taxi

Posted by Paul Taboure in Advertising, Design, and News.
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Volvo LifePaint

LifePaint is a wearable product that helps to make cyclists more visible at night. Read more.

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Volvo LifePaint

To promote how Volvo’s IntelliSafe system that protects both cyclists and pedestrians, they gave out special cans of spray paint in London bike shops.

Applying LifePaint on bikes or clothing makes them glow luminously when they’re in the path of a car’s headlights. LifePaint washes off, and will not damage the colour or the surface of your chosen material.

Volvo raised awareness of the product with a YouTube film, which has been watched more than 4.7 million times. It was reported that the cans were out of stock in 72 hours.

The reflective and street-like aesthetic of the paint gives the product some intrigue and credibility, which also possibly engaged a varied audience and raised awareness of road safety. A very successful and considered campaign!

Read more here

 

Posted by Dave in Advertising, Branding and .
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THERE says "I do" to Woolloomooloo

After our successful signage and placemaking expedition at Ovolo Woolloomooloo, THERE is back for round 2 – creating a wedding toolkit for their picturesque wharf side hotel. Read more.

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THERE says "I do" to Woolloomooloo

After our successful signage and placemaking expedition at Ovolo Woolloomooloo, THERE is back for round 2 – creating a wedding toolkit for their picturesque wharf side hotel. 

Our designers had a lot of fun with this project, with tattoos, milkshakes and motorcycles IN the question. Ovolo Woolloomoolloo sits on the breathtaking Finger Wharf, and has been working hard over the last couple of years to give Sydney a fresh and vibrant new venue for the ‘living and working traveller’. 

With it’s venues that highlight the hotel’s heritage listed features, we had no problems in creating a new wedding toolkit that was a one stop shop for new bride-to-be’s. THERE conducted a live photoshoot for this brochure, which helped deliver beautiful imagery that accompanied the brochure’s Ovolo brand persona. 

For more information about an Ovolo wedding, please feel free to contact Ovolo Woolloomooloo or pop in for a drink and check out Ovolo’s great spaces.

 

Posted by THERE Staff in Advertising, Branding, Fashion and Hospitality.
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THERE published in Brand Built

THERE are excited to be featured six times throughout Brand Built's new book, published by RHED. Read more.

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THERE published in Brand Built

THERE are excited to be featured multiple times throughout the Brand Built’s new book. Brand Built is published by RHED.

Selected from international projects from around the world it demonstrates Australia delivers world class creative property marketing campaigns.

Published work includes, Dulwich Green, Minton House, 338 Pitt Street, De Node, 35 Clarence Street and Parklands.

These projects covered both residential and commercial properties and are centred on how people engage the built form.

 As a globally recognised publication, it showcases the best of branding in the property industry. As the boom of the property market continues to grow across the world, it is critical to remain competitive, be able to cut through the messaging and stand out. These successful campaigns were able to deliver great results for the clients and exceed expectations. 

Thank you to our clients for trusting us and our proven creative process which led to authentic stories to be told that were unearthed from each of these projects. 

 

 

 

Posted by THERE staff in Property, Press, Advertising and Design.
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