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A Festive Studio Warming

End of Year Studio Party Read more.

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A Festive Studio Warming

End of Year Studio Party

We celebrated the end of a challenging year on a high note with a party for friends and supporters of THERE. It was also an opportunity for us to officially toast our new studio space. Thanks to everyone who came along it was great to see you all – there were definitely a few sore heads in the studio next day!

Posted by Paul Taboure in Play, People and News.
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Bowling for a good cause

Stylecraft Bowling for Cancer Event Read more.

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Bowling for a good cause

Stylecraft Bowling for Cancer Event

THERE are proud to be once again partnering with Stylecraft in helping them with this years Bowling for Cancer evening.

Over the last three years the event has helped raise over $80,000 for the Cancer Council. This year’s target is an ambitious $50,000!

Tickets for this fun event with an ever changing theme (this year is Cowboys and Indians!)have already all been allocated, however cheque donations are still gratefully accepted and should be made out to The Cancer Council and posted to Stylecraft PO Box 584 Darlinghurst NSW 1300.

All funds raised go to the Cancer Council and are split between donations for Breast and Prostate Cancer.

Posted by Paul Taboure in Architecture, Interiors, Branding, News and Play.
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New York Baby!

I have just returned from a very cold but amazing trip to New York after winning a competition organised by BJ Ball and Mohawk paper. Read more.

Insights
New York Baby!

I have just returned from an amazing trip to New York. Along with my husband Ben, I entered and won (!!) a competition organised held by paper companies BJ Ball and Mohawk paper. The prize included a trip to NYC, a visit to the celebrated design studio Pentagram, as well as a tour of the Mohawk Paper mill. 

We won the prize after making a video about the importance of paper in our day to day lives - and how we would miss it if it wasn't there. You can view the video here.

After a long flight, we touched down to a bitterly cold but beautifully sunny New York. Such an amazing place - so much energy, diversity and a city of so many people. We experienced a lot of the must-dos on any visitors list - stunning views from the top of the Empire State Building, the crowds and lights of Times Square, eating giant pretzels from a street vendor, listening to some talented buskers playing on the Subway, as well as visiting MOMA, taking gentle strolls around Central Park, and walking The High Line, a disused elevated stretch of railway line repurposed to create a ‘floating’ community park space. 

 

The two highlights of the trip though, were the things that most visitors wouldn’t get the chance to do - visiting Pentagram and the Mohawk paper mill. 

At Pentagram we were lucky enough to be meet with Michael Beruit - award winning designer and partner at Pentagram. We had a tour of the busy studio whilst hearing about some of the history of the building - it’s former uses including being a bank, a dress making shop as well as a night club. Michael spoke about the unique way in which the studio was run, which includes having a number of accountable partners over several international offices, each having their own design teams. 

It was great to hear that Michael still very much has a hands on design role, as is sometimes not the case as designers progress in their careers. We also heard about the beginnings of Pentagram - part of the reason the studio was initially formed was out of necessity - starting you own studio 40 years ago was a very different thing to setting up now, where you can get away with a laptop and a good internet connection. Not such the case back then when starting a studio needed much more of a financial outlay as well as huge suite of hardware and space.

We spoke about how the industry had changed and how the public were now much more aware and informed about design. It would have been unimaginable for the kind of outspoken public opinion we see today in reaction to high profile design projects, but social media means everyone can have a say. It means we as designers have to be on top of our work - making sure our rationales behind what we do are researched and solid, so we can be confident that when our work goes public we can stand up and believe in it, as well as giving our clients the confidence to do the same. It does seem though, that although the mediums we design for may have changed, the core of what a designer does; creative problem solving, listening and understanding clients needs followed by struggling with that brief for days on end have, essentially stayed the same. 

It was great to meet such a influential designer, who was genuinely a lovley chap. One thing Michael said stuck in my mind, and that was that it is a great time to be a designer now, and that reminds me to feel lucky to work in the great creative industry that we do.

The other highlight of our visit to New York was the trip to the Mohawk Paper Mill (named after the Mohawk River I found out). We took an early train out of the city to Albany - a a beautiful journey which follows the Hudson River, gleaming with ice in the low winter sun. We were greeted by Joe O’Connor, who spoke enthuastically about working for his family company - and as we arrived at the Mill he proudly pointed out grand portraits hung on the wall of his late father and grandfather. A very knowledgable Rich Barker gave us an in depth tour of the mill, and as he showed us around it was clear to see his and the rest of the team’s passion and attention to detail showing through in what they did. I have a new respect for something which is an old craft and clearly takes time a dedication to achieve the beautiful results which the Mohawk team do.

We had lunch with Joe, as well as Jane and Pam from the marketing team. They spoke about the challenges and changes facing their industry, and how they are always innovating and working with new suppliers and companies as the needs and expectations of the client changes. We also had a sneek peek at an exciting new project the team has been working on with Michael from Pentagram and Massimo Vignelli. 

Again, Ben and myself were thrilled to meet such a friendly, down to earth team at Mohawk, all with a real passion for what they do. We also got a brief introduction to the President of Mohawk before we left - Jack Haren, who was an absolute delight to meet. A huge thank you to the team at BJ Ball and Mohawk for organising such a wonderful experience - we had a fantastic time, and will remember the trip fondly for years to come.

Posted by Cloud White in Design, Insights, People, Play and Print.
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Oz Pharmaceutical

We were invited by renowned industry publication Desktop to create a brand from a work of fiction. Read more.

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Oz Pharmaceutical

Desktop is a leading industry publication covering 'the culture of design'. THERE have regularly appeared in the magazine, whether through coverage of our work, or through contributing articles for the printed and online publications. For their most recent issue, THERE was invited as part of a select group of Australia's leading designers to imagine brands for people, places or organisations from works of fiction. Free from constraints of clients, budget or time, the studio's only limit was their imagination.

Created by author L. Frank Baum, we're all well aware of the magical Land of Oz, most likely from watching the film The Wizard of Oz. In the film, and many of the Oz books, characters find their inner strength, their inner voice and discover talents they always had, but never realised were there. We began by considering how to create a brand for the land of Oz, with the obvious first step creating a destination brand, and finding ways to sell Oz as a place of sensory delights and transformative experiences. But we kept thinking resolving Oz as a destination was lacking - what if we took the core ideas of Oz - transformation, and self discovery - and re-interpreted for the modern world.

Everyone has a unique talent that could, if embraced, could take them outside the bell curve. What if 'Somewhere over the rainbow' you could discover a new, better you? Our modern society is obsessed with self improvement and redefining our identity - from curating your Facebook to cosmetic surgeries, all united by the desire to create the best you possible. Thus we had a compelling mix - for those desperate to change, to be better, here's a a truly transformative experience that helps you reach that goal, not through cosmetic adjusting the outside, but by discovering unique talents buried deep inside your psyche.

Perhaps Oz is a big pharmaceutical company, and it's new signature product is The Rainbow, a psychotherapeutic drug, administered through the patients eyes as beam of light. It's a bizarre idea, and the identity we developed to express this is suitably odd. The eye at the centre of the brand mark is equal parts ominous and intriguing, warping perception with it's complex and impossible form. The supporting visual language manipulates colour and perspective evoking how the 'The Rainbow' treatment changes you, from the inside out.

Posted by Celia Armitage in Branding, Design, Identity, Play and Press.
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Northern Lights in Dutch Skies

Amazing light installation that makes reference to an aurora borealis by IJssel near Westervoort. Read more.

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Northern Lights in Dutch Skies

I’m always on the look out to see what a favourite designer of mine, Daan Roosegarde (founder of Studio Roosegarde) is working on or about to come out of the woodworks. And he doesn’t disappoint with his latest work titled ‘Waterlicht’ (Waterlight) a collaboration with Dutch water board Rhine and IJssel that premiered on the 25th February.

This light installation makes references to an aurora borealis located above a flood channel on Netherland’s River, IJssel near Westervoort. It’s dubbed by the studio as, “the northern lights of the Netherlands”, and once you’ve seen it you can see why - with it’s waving lines that spread across 1.6 hectares. 

However, from a distance in the surrounding dykes the blue LEDs give way to the moving motion of where water would be, if the defences were not in place. “Walking on the dyke the light lines are perceived as high water, once in the flood channel you find yourself in an underwater world,” said Roosegarde. It’s like a virtual flood. 

The light source, from the LEDs are projected through lenses to help focus the light which have been installed around the periphery of the area. They have been positioned so that the beams crisscross in midair as they move giving that illusion of the movement of water. 

What’s great about this work besides it’s beauty, is that it also brings to light that theNetherlands lies below sea level, giving way to what it could be like without its dykes. 

This piece of work, seen as invisible will look to be visible in the coming years at various locations within Netherlands.

Posted by Justine Lesmana in Art, News, Play, People, , Design and Environmental.
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Test your inner design nerd

Online games to test your design skills. Read more.

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Test your inner design nerd

The Method of Action site has a range games and tools to help test your design skills and have a bit of fun. The site creates some educational entertainment out of what can sometimes be taken for granted.

The site includes keyboard shortcuts and touchscreen compatibility which adds to the intuitive, enjoyable user experience. You can tell that there has been some time invested with the clean UI design and attention to detail.

The kerning game 'Kern Me' allows you to move a few of the letterforms around to achieve the correct kerning and gives you a score depending on how well you’ve done. It also superimposes your result over the correct kerning to see how you might be able to improve.

Even if you feel like your version is correct there is an option for you to share your version with the site's creator as feedback.

Also not only can you can test your kerning skills but can also test your control with the pen tool.
Happy keming ;)

Posted by Dave in Design, Digital, Play and Web.
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Positive Negatives

Exploring 12 great examples of the art of negative space in design Read more.

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Positive Negatives

Negative space is defined as 'the space that surrounds an object' in a image. In design, negative space helps to define the boundaries of positive space and brings balance to a composition. Here are 12 impressive examples

More and more these days, the creative world is seeing an emergence of artists creating positive spaces and shapes that, in turn, cleverly carve out shapes in negative space intentionally. And the results can be stunning. Here, we've found some brilliant examples - enjoy!

Harvey Esparcia – This simple yet striking logo design is the personal logo study from Filipino designer Harvey Esparcia who uses negative space to combine his initial letters.

 

Designer Tang Yau Hoong uses a simple and straight-forward illustration style to get the most out of the negative space. Using just the two shades allows the clever negative space trick to jump out.

 A graduate of the Bezalel Academy of Art & Design, Noma Bar is an award-winning graphic designer, famous for his 'negative space style'. Using a limited colour palette, Bar carefully crafts and places positive space to give the negative space another meaning.

Using the bare minimum to communicate his message, Bar's distinctive work has gained him international recognition and work with leading companies including Vodafone, Coca Cola and the BBC.

This example uses negative space trickery to depict Batman VS Penguin

It's Batman VS Penguin in this poster. Part of a Criminal Underworld series, it cleverly depicts both characters using negative space trickery.

The bald head and long pointy nose are instantly identifiable as Danny Devito's Penguin, which in turn, carves out the strong, bold silhouette of Michael Keaton as Batman. Very clever.

 

 

Leo Burnett in Brazil have come up trumps once again with this clever new campaign for car manufacturer Fiat, which encourages drivers not to send text messages while drving.

A great example is The Guild of Food Writers' logo, the replacement of the pen's nib with a spoon shape creates a simple, clever and impactful logo.

 

 

 

Posted by Paul Taboure in Design, Branding, Play and Insights.
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Dancer bends light

Dancer bends light in stunning projection-mapped performance Read more.

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Dancer bends light

Inside a cube fashioned from translucent veils, a dancer takes a visual journey into a 3D space between dreams and reality. 

Hakanaï is a digital solo performance from Adrien M / Claire B that made its debut at BAM’s Fishman Theatre on March 17, 2015. The choreographed performance installation combines video projection mapping, CGI, and sensors to dynamically respond to the movements and proximity of its performer. Its visuals and sounds are generated and animated live, offering a uniquely different performance for each and every iteration. 

 

Source:
http://thecreatorsproject.vice.com/blog/dancer-bends-light-in-stunning-projection-mapped-performance

Posted by Simon Hancock in Art, Environmental, Insights, and Play.
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The Sydney Opera House as a living mural

Universal Everything creates a living mural out of the Sydney Opera House. Read more.

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The Sydney Opera House as a living mural

Universal Everything creates a living mural out of the Sydney Opera House.

I've been intrigued by the work of Matt Pyke since his early days at The Designers Republic through to his current work at Universal Everything.

His work for Universal Everything extends outside of standard design application with a multi-disciplinary style applied through various technologies. It’s been interesting to see how his curious and playful style adapts to a range of forms and spaces.

This year he has been commissioned to create animations which will be projected onto the Opera House as part of the Vivid Festival. The animations will include collaborations from 22 different animation artists from around the world.

It’ll be great to see Universal Everything’s unique approach and what visuals he’s dreamt up, turning the iconic landmark into a living mural.

Posted by Dave in Art, Branding, Digital, Environmental, Motion, People and Play.
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