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Placemaking in the wild

Typically, placemaking is intended to endure for a significant amount of time to give a place its identity and personality. Artist Simon Beck and his transient large-scale artworks manages to reinvent a new sense of placemaking, in the natural environment. Read more.

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Placemaking in the wild

Using locations such as the Swiss Alps and sandy beaches in New Zealand, Beck creates massive geometric artworks using his footprints by trudging across sand or through snow. 

Each site usually stretches for hundreds of metres and each site-specific piece is pre-planned using a computer and carefully mapped out on-site. Beck then can spend entire days painstakingly trampling out the intricate patterns. Well that's one way of keeping fit whilst working! 

Several years worth of his work can be appreciated on Facebook

(via Colossal)

Posted by Jon Zhu in Art, Environmental, Insights and .
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Kinetic Rain

A kinetic sculpture besed in Changi Airport, Singapore. Read more.

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Kinetic Rain

I stumbled across a number of kinetic sculptures recently, however this centerpiece in the Changi Airport, Singapore is particularly fascinating and a nice contrast in a fast-paced environment.


Kinetic Rain is an installation created by by Art+Com, a German design firm led by Jussi Angesleva. It is the world's largest kinetic sculpture made up of 1,216 polished copper raindrops. Controlled by 1,216 individual motors the drops transform elegantly to depict the forms of flight and experiences of travel.

Posted by therestaff in Motion, , and .
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Contemporary logos meet historical art

What happens when design and art separated by 500 years come together? Read more.

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Contemporary logos meet historical art

As innovative designers we often seek inspiration from contemporary design, historical art and everything in between.  

When Filipino graphic artist, Eisen Bernard, removed the 500 years of everything in between with his unique juxtapositions, we got reminded of how much design and art have evolved over time. 

Here at THERE, we often look beyond the realms of design to help us ideate and innovate. Essentially taking a step back or moving laterally in order to leap forward.

 

Apple meets The Son of Man by René Magritte


NASA meets The Starry Night by Vincent Van Gogh

 

Ferrari meets Napoleon Crossing the Alps by Jacques-Louis David

 

Air Jordan meets Death of Ajax by Henri Auguste Calixte César Serrur

 

Playboy meets Young Hare by Albrecht Dürer

 

To see the Eisen's full set of juxtapositions, click here

 

Posted by Scott McNamara in Art and Design.
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Now Hiring - Are you out THERE

A new opportunity for Enviro-Graphic Designers to join the growing THERE team Read more.

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Now Hiring - Are you out THERE

This is a opportunity to join our growing team and work on some awesome projects with a great team producing amazing high-end design

Mid weight Graphic Environmental Designers
(Contract &/or Full time)

Senior Graphic Environmental Designers
(Contract &/or Full time)

The Company
THERE are one of Australias leading creative specialist agencies. Our award-winning dynamic studios are in Singapore & Sydney.

We design branded experiences for the built environment that capture imagination and positively influence the way people think, feel and do.

We are looking to fill 2 roles in our Sydney Studio;
– Mid-weight Graphic Environmental Designers
– Senior Graphic Environmental Designers  

The Contract Role
You will be working alongside our Head of Environments and design team for high profile clients such as Google, AFP, Lendlease and Linked In.

You will need to be skilled at creating bespoke designs for interior and exterior environments, wayfinding & signage.

You will need to have:
– Have a good sense for 3D design
– Understand masterplanning
– Have a high-end design aesthetic
– Design development and documentation drawings and
– Have a good knowledge of materiality and production in the built environment.

It will be an advantage if you have experience/qualifications in:
– Industrial design
– Interior design
– Architecture

You will thrive on being creative, meticulous, confident in dealing with clients, handling multiple projects in THERE’s busy studio. We expect you to be driven, be able to work autonomously and get on with the job at hand whilst having fun doing it.

Benefits include:
- Opportunities for training and development.
- Part of a friendly team in the highly-creative area of Surry hills melting pot
- Great work culture, team outings, lunches, keep fit every week

The ideal candidate:
Applications are sought from self-starter candidates who have:
– Strong environmental skills (From concept through to construction)
– Strong design and documentation skills
– Adobe skilled (Indesign, Photoshop and Illustrator)
– Able to manage multiple projects at one time
– High attention to detail
– Tenacious attitude and highly motivated
– 4+ years in enviro design
– Fun, friendly, strong communicator and collaborator


Please note:
– Only Successful applicants will be contacted
– Must have working visa / residency
– No Recruitment agencies pls.

Apply:
– CV/folio and covering letter to info@there.com.au

Posted by Paul Taboure in News and People.
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Old is New Again

A new trend in environmental graphics that has its roots firmly planted in the past. Read more.

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Old is New Again

The old saying that fashion is cyclical seems to be ringing true recently with environmental graphics, as old styles of signage, graphics and typography are being reinvented for a modern audience.

Whilst it is said that 50 years is required for a fashionable look to come back in style,
some recent design projects go back a lot further.

Stained glass windows make a reappearance in this first project by Dutch-based illustrator Stefan Glerum. Two new super-scale designs that depict the history of the building's area adorn a residential project in Amsterdam and combine a centuries-old glazing technique with a graphic style reminiscent of the Art Deco or Bauhaus movements.

On a smaller scale, we've also started to see signage styles replicate the techniques of eras gone by.

This floor-marker signage seen at Sightglass Coffee in San Francisco uses mosaics to provide a fun twist on typography. Taken by @mihailonaca via @canva

Designed by A friend of Mine, the new euro-style dessert restaurant in South Melbourne features a custom-mosaic wall signage. The crafted typography with intricate patterns in a bold and geometric typeface gives a sense of modernity whilst drawing on the traditional techiniques of tiling and gives this boutique a sense of place.

And closer to home, Sydney-based Lynes & Co are doing some beautifully hand-crafted work with traditional signwriting techniques.

Posted by Charlie Bromley & Justine Lesmana in Environmental, and Design.
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THERE features in ArtPower Annual

THERE features in the Way Of The Sign Annual by ArtPower Read more.

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THERE features in ArtPower Annual

The 'Way of the Sign V' Annual is a collection of the newest and best projects on signage and wayfinding from Asia Pacific Region.

Announcing THERE has been featured in this years Way of the Sign Annual by Artpower, and this year, THERE's ECD Paul Tabouré was invited to write the book's preface. 

A number of projects include branded environment work for; Suntory, 10/10 Harper Stylecraft and Cabravale Leisure are amongst those featured in this beautifully curated book which interestingly categories projects by colour and materiality in the two volume set. 

Vol.1 features white, black and material finishes such as concrete, bronze, etc. while Vol.2 is more vibrant, with each chapter focusing on a key colour as it goes through the colour wheel. 

As experts in creating brand experiences across the built environment, including signage and wayfinding design, we were delighted for our Executive Creative Director and founder Paul Tabouré to be invited to contribute the preface on THERE's design philosophies and inspirations. 

 

Posted by Justine Lesmana in Environmental, Design, People, , and News.
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Please Do Touch

A look into galleries and exhibitions that are a far cry from the usual Do No Touch mentality. Read more.

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Please Do Touch

We’re all accustomed to the sterile white-washed walls and ‘Do Not Touch’ signs in art galleries, making these spaces a rather uninviting place and less than engaging experience. However, it’s great to see exhibits that breakthrough these traditional boundaries, and seek for visitors to discover, explore and better yet play with pieces of work, adding to an added dimension to the typical gallery visit. 

 

TUBO, an exhibition commissioned for Hangzhou International Design Week feels at first like any other exhibition with it’s blank white walls, but it isn’t. At the centre of the space if a pool of 20,000 multi-coloured foam tubes which can be used to to transform the perforated white walls and food sculptures into a 3D Colouring Book as children are encouraged to interact, touch and play. Using Tubo they knit the walls, make shapes, dress pieces creating a burst of colour. 

An initiative at Cleveland Museum of Art, many years on continues to attract new visitors as well as surprise existing with their concept, ‘Gallery One’ a series of novel interactive exhibitions creating a new and dynamic experience that blend art and technology as part of a museum practice. 

Browsing collections is an interactive game with gestures, facial expressions pulling together and curating artworks through a digital screen - giving each individual the opportunity to enjoy it in their own way, rather than dictating a single method.

Another exhibition that engages new technologies and provides a a departure from the traditional science exhibitry is ‘Learning to See’ as part of the permanent exhibit in the new Science Pyramid at Denver Botanic Gardens that brings to life stories hidden within Colorado’s landscape.

A unique sensory experience - interactive pylons seek for visitors to peer into peepholes to watch videos, use their own bodies as amplifiers to listen to the sound of the ecosystem. This is all within a responsive environment that reflects cycles of nature through LED lighting and software interface elements which are responsive to the Garden, creating an activating interior space that is not only informative but engaging. What’s even better about this exhibitions, is that as the research evolves the digital components are easily able to updated accordingly

It’s great to see a breakthrough in the usual museum experience of ‘Don’t Touch’, and how new technologies merge with museum and it’s exhibits in creating new and dynamic experiences for the visitor that become more memorable. Definitely the type of museum / gallery visit I'm looking for! 

Posted by Justine Lesmana in Environmental, Design, Views, Insights and Interiors.
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Glowing Maze Installation

Lasermaze is an illumination delight, a spatial puzzle within an old train underpass located in Detroit. Read more.

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Glowing Maze Installation

Lasermaze is an illumination delight, a spatial puzzle within an old train underpass located in Detroit.

At first one appears to think this installation is formed by laser beams, however this is not the case. Rather this illuminated structured space spanning a 6.7 metres by 6.7 metres space is actually made up of five kilometres of ultra violet (UV) thread woven through steel chains with more than 3000 tied knots all by hand. 

The location of this installation is site specific, conceived as part of the Detroit Design Festival this year but more importantly as an act of a larger regeneration effort for the area. Located in an underpass along Dequindre Cut, a linear park and pedestrian path between the city’s riverfront, various residential neighbourhoods and the bustling Eastern Market district. 

Lasermaze uses contrasting properties which were chosen specifically by UK architect, George Knight as a mark of representing Detroit. The past through the use of robust, steel, scaffolding and it’s future with the lightweight, glowing thread. All illuminated with two sets of UV LED floodlights on opposing sides of the installation. This UV light interweaves with the wool thread causing it to glow inviting visitors into the space and be lost within it’s playful structure as they move through, in and out and between the structural forms and walls. Ultimately creating an immersive experience within what is essentially a spatial puzzle in itself and sparking the inner child within this architectural wonder.

Posted by Justine Lesmana in Design, Environmental, Architecture and .
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Singapore Number Blocks

As designers we are drawn to a good grid. Paul Steinhauer's photography of Singapore blocks calls out to exactly this - orderly in all of us. Read more.

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Singapore Number Blocks

As designers we are drawn to a good grid. And I for one, like the idea of symmetry, uniformity and the relationship of scale and elements together created when using a grid to design. 

So it’s no wonder American photographer, Paul Steinhauer’s series of Singapore apartment blocks calls out to me. It’s a call out to the orderly in all of us.

The strong grid-like structures made by the buildings within Singapore’s cityscape is the focus of Steinhauer’s photography.

The bold and somewhat unexpected colour combinations with the use of fonts like Arial to handwritten brush script seem like they would clash. However everything seems to work in perfect harmony drawing you even further to the buildings and it’s architectural wonder. But what makes these photographs even more intriguing to me is the glimmer of human activity within the confinements of these coloured brick and concrete grids, such as clean washing draping and washing lines. 

It's a small reminder as designers inspiration can be taken from anywhere - if you just look up, down and around. 

Posted by Justine Lesmana in Architecture, Design, Environmental, and Insights.
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